DMM Klein Tools MM600

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Klein Tools say their meters are robust. I am not going to test that, but it feels that way.

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I got this meter without a box, but in the holster.

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It contained the meter, the holster, probes, alligator clips, thermocoupler, batteries and a manual (This manual can also be downloaded). It was missing an adapter for the termocoupler, it is supposed to be there.

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The standard probes are normal sizes and rated for 10A

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And CAT II 1000V or CAT III 1000V/CAT IV 600V depending on the tip covers.

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The plugs are fully shrouded and standard probe size.

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The alligator clips can be mounted when the tip covers are removed and gives CAT III 1000V protection.

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The thermoprobe has a standard thermocoupler connector and requires an adapter in the multimeter.

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The range switch is rubberized and a bit hard to turn, but the heavy meter with the rubber cover can keep the meter is place for single handed usage both when meter is lying on the table or standing on the tilting bale.

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Display

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All the segments are shown during power on.

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Typical display during usage, it will show the number and selected measurement



Functions

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Buttons: Rotary switch:

Input

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Measurements
1uF

A look at the capacity measurement waveform for 1uF.

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Tear down

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I had to remove the batteries and 6 screws, before I could open the meter.

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A corner of the plastic around the small fuse fits into a slots in the circuit board

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As usual the circuit board is shaped to fit the enclosure.

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Getting the circuit board out was 4 nuts and 7 screws, this meter is made to be tough.

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The resistors in zig-zag (R8, R9, R21, R22, R23: 5*180K->0.9Mohm) is one of the input chains, it is also protected by two MOVs and a PTC on the other side. The 10Mohm input chain is R4 and R5 (PTC and MOV is on the other side). There is a lot of transistor pars (Q11 & Q12, Q1 & Q7, Q5 & Q6, Q4 & Q9) for protection.
The four diodes (D13, D14, D16, D17) and the probably zener (D15) is protection of the uA and mA current shunt (R14 & R15).
The main multimeter chip is DM1106EN with a 24LC02B for calibration. It looks like a boost regulator around U2 and L1 to supply the backlight.

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This side is more input protection, including the ohm/capacitance range, that is handled by MOV2, the resistor and a PTC. It is a very sparse populated range switch.

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I wanted to check under the LCD display, there was nothing, but the black border on the LCD display is soft rubber.



Conclusion

I am impressed with how solid this meter is constructed. It is made for electrician work (It starts in AC). It has all the common ranges, but for an electricians meter it is missing a Low-Z mode, True-RMS would also have been nice. Frequency is only on AC and always in frequency range, it is not possible to measure in volt or current ranges.
After looking at the meter I believe the "Tough meter" claim.


Notes

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